Testicular cancer is a disease by which cells become malignant in a single or both testicles. Testicular cancer occurs when the cells become malignant either in one or both testicles.

Testicular cancer, or cancer from the testes, occurs in the testicles, within the scrotum. Testicular cancer is a disease by which cells become malignant in a single or both testicles. Testicular cancer makes up about only 1% of cancer in males, but it is the most common cancer found in men between the ages of 15 and 35 years old, and the incidence of this condition continues to be increasing over the last hundred years.

Testicular cancer occurs when the cells become malignant either in one or both testicles. White males, particularly those of Scandinavian descent are more prone to developing the disease compared to other men. Male sex hormones, testosterone, and sperm for reproduction are made in the testicles. The testicles really are a pair of male sex glands, also known as gonads. Testosterone controls the development of the reproductive organs, along with other male physical characteristics. Here are symptoms of testicular cancer.

Risk Factors For Testicular Cancer

  • Undescended Testicle

Within 3% of boys, one or both testicles don’t move from the belly into the scrotum before birth like they should. Most testicles will move recorded on their own in the child’s first year. Sometimes surgical treatment is needed to bring the testicle into the scrotum.

  • Family History

A family history of testicular cancer boosts the risk. But very few men with testicular cancer possess a family history of it.

  • HIV Infection

Men have contracted HIV seem to have a heightened risk of testicular cancer. This may be particularly true for men who have AIDS.

  • CIS (Carcinoma In Situ)

CIS is described in What is testicular cancer? It isn’t clear how frequently CIS in the testicles becomes cancer. Frequently it’s found when a man is tested for infertility. It could also be found when a man includes a testicle removed because of cryptorchidism.

  • Age

About half of testicular cancers occur in men between the ages of 20 and 34. However this cancer can affect males of all ages, including infants and older men.

  • Height

There is evidence that men who are taller than average have an increased risk of testicular cancer and men who are shorter than average have a reduced risk.

Testicular Cancer

Testicular Cancer

Symptoms And Complications of Testicular Cancer

The symptoms of testicular cancer include:

  • An easy lump in the testicle (common)
  • Dull ache or pain within the groin or abdomen (uncommon)
  • Enlargement of the testicle (common)
  • Pain, discomfort, or perhaps a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum (uncommon)
  • Discomfort or pain in the testicle (uncommon)
  • Occasionally, symptoms arise from disease that has already spread to other organs, for example lumps in the neck, cough because of cancer in the lungs, lower back pain due to cancer in the bones, and, rarely, neurological problems due to nerve or brain problems.